Google’s TV advertising

Google’s recent forays into TV advertising in the UK have prompted some debate. I first encountered it in the middle of last night’s Britain’s Got Talent finals. And I enjoyed it. (More so than the Britain’s Got Talent finals.)

The advertising is very aspirational. It revolves around content, predominantly email, to children not yet old enough to appreciate it. Content that can be looked back upon with affection years later.

Malcolm Coles speculated that it marked the end of Google.

Gmail advert on TV? Google’s finished then …

I fundamentally disagree.

Google is trying to give its core non-search offerings wider appeal. It’s trying to crack markets that are not yet enjoying its products, both those online and those offline. And, in my view, it sees TV as a valid and viable route into the latter. Just as it undertook a sizeable poster campaign recently extolling the virtues of Chrome.

The fact that Google carries advertising does not mean that it cannot and should not use other media and providers to advertise its offering. Just as Ask advertises on Google. And ITV uses posters to advertise its upcoming programmes.

I think this move is a sign of maturity from Google. It shows that they acknowledge that they are not monopolistic in the advertising space, and that they must exploit other media to grow their market share.

I like the adverts. And they’re likely to appeal, in my opinion, to the older market in which I expect they’re less well-established. (In no way am I suggesting that these two sentences are related, btw.)

Comments

One Response to “Google’s TV advertising”

  1. malcolm coles on June 5th, 2011 21:37

    “I think this move is a sign of maturity from Google”.

    It’s a sign of something – the interesting thing for me was why Google feels the need to. Is it running out of new product ideas and needs to get more value from its existing ones like Gmail? Is its product no longer obviously better than its competitors’ – as has been the case for most of its history? Or is it a sign that the brand is just becoming a normal one – maturing as you say? Or something else? Or all of those?

    I couldn’t fit all that into 140 characters though 😉

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